Tag Archives: threats of climate change

Climate Risks in Africa – Attempt at quantification

Climate Risks in Africa – Attempt at quantification: The impact of climate change on Africa is catastrophic, with severe risks that threaten to destroy communities, economies, and the environment. Time is running out, and immediate action is desperately needed to mitigate the devastating consequences of these risks. Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to the impacts of climate change. With a rapidly growing population and a largely agricultural-based economy, the region is facing a multitude of challenges in adapting to a changing climate. The impacts of climate change in Africa are wide-ranging, from increased food and water insecurity to the spread of disease, and the displacement of communities.

Climate Risks in Africa – Attempt at quantification

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projects that by the end of this century, average temperatures in Africa are likely to increase by between 2.5 and 4.4 degrees Celsius. This increase in temperature will have a significant impact on Africa’s ecosystems and the livelihoods of its people. The region’s rainfall patterns are also projected to change, with some areas experiencing increased precipitation and others experiencing decreased precipitation. This will result in changes to water availability and increased risk of both flooding and drought.

One of the most immediate impacts of climate change in Africa is on agriculture. With much of the region relying on rain-fed agriculture, changes in rainfall patterns and increased frequency of droughts are putting food security at risk. A decrease in crop yields could result in food shortages and price increases, particularly for staple crops like maize, cassava, and rice. This could have serious consequences for the region’s population, particularly for the most vulnerable communities.

Another major impact of climate change in Africa is on the region’s water resources. Changes in rainfall patterns, combined with increased evaporation due to higher temperatures, are likely to result in water scarcity in many areas. This could have serious implications for drinking water, irrigation, and hydropower generation. It could also result in increased competition for water resources, particularly in areas where water is already scarce.

The spread of disease is also a growing concern as a result of climate change in Africa. Changes in temperature and rainfall patterns are likely to result in the expansion of disease-carrying insects, such as mosquitoes and ticks, into new areas. This could result in the spread of diseases such as malaria and dengue fever to new regions, putting additional pressure on already overburdened health systems.

The displacement of communities is another significant impact of climate change in Africa. With increased frequency of extreme weather events such as floods and droughts, communities may be forced to abandon their homes and livelihoods. This could result in the displacement of millions of people and increase the risk of conflict over resources such as land and water.

Here are 10 countries in Africa most impacted by climate risks, along with some specific statistics:

Climate Risks in Africa – Attempt at quantification:

Ethiopia

Climate change is affecting agriculture and water resources in Ethiopia, leading to food and water insecurity and increasing the risk of conflict over resources. Around 85% of Ethiopia’s population is dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods, making them particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

Somalia

Somalia is facing a range of climate risks, including increased frequency of drought, flooding, and the spread of disease. According to the World Bank, Somalia is the country most at risk of drought in Africa.
Sudan: Climate change is affecting agriculture and water resources in Sudan, leading to food and water insecurity and increasing the risk of conflict over resources. Around 80% of Sudan’s population is dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods.

Kenya

Kenya is facing a range of climate risks, including decreased rainfall, water scarcity, and the spread of disease. In 2019, Kenya experienced its worst drought in decades, affecting over 2.7 million people and over 4.3 million in 2022.

Niger

Niger is one of the countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with a rapidly growing population and a largely agricultural-based economy. Over 90% of Niger’s population is dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods.

Mali

Mali is facing a range of climate risks, including decreased rainfall, water scarcity, and the spread of disease. According to the World Bank, Mali is one of the countries in Africa most at risk of flooding.

Uganda

Uganda is facing a range of climate risks, including decreased rainfall, water scarcity, and the spread of disease. In 2019, Uganda experienced its worst drought in decades, affecting over 1.7 million people.

Senegal

Senegal is facing a range of climate risks, including increased frequency of flooding and the spread of disease. In 2017, Senegal experienced its worst flooding in decades, affecting over 600,000 people.

Mozambique

Mozambique is facing a range of climate risks, including increased frequency of flooding and the spread of disease. In 2019, Mozambique experienced its worst flooding in decades, affecting over 2 million people.

Madagascar

Madagascar is facing a range of climate risks, including decreased rainfall, water scarcity, and the spread of disease. In 2019, Madagascar experienced its worst drought in decades, affecting over 2 million people.

Africa has a number of strengths that could be leveraged to help mitigate the impacts of climate change

Despite these challenges, Africa has a number of strengths that could be leveraged to help mitigate the impacts of climate change. The region has a large, young, and growing population, with a strong tradition of innovation and entrepreneurship. With the right support, Africa’s entrepreneurs could play a crucial role in developing and implementing new technologies and approaches to address the impacts of climate change.

There is also growing recognition of the need for international cooperation to help address the impacts of climate change in Africa. The Paris Agreement, adopted at the 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), recognizes the special challenges facing developing countries, including Africa, in adapting to a changing climate. The agreement calls for developed countries to provide financial and technical assistance to help developing countries mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

The reality of climate change in Africa is devastating, with the continent facing a range of interconnected risks that threaten the livelihoods, health, and future of its people. The exponential population growth, combined with poverty, over-reliance on agriculture, and poor governance has only compounded these risks. The geopolitical divide between the global north and global south on climate discourses has also added to the challenges Africa is facing.

Statistics show the devastating impact of these risks on the continent. In some countries, up to 90% of the population relies on agriculture for their livelihoods, making them particularly vulnerable to the impacts of droughts, floods, and other climate-related disasters. The lack of access to healthcare and clean water is also exacerbating the spread of disease outbreaks, with malaria and dengue fever being some of the most serious threats.

Morocco is known as a ‘Champion in the Fight Against Climate Change’

Morocco is known as a ‘Champion in the Fight Against Climate Change’. Here are five things Morocco is doing to reap the triple benefits of adapting to climate change, lessening its impact and creating new opportunities:

  • Morocco aims to generate 52% of its electricity needs from renewable energy by 2030, and is stimulating local manufacturing with a target of sourcing 35% of the second phase of the NOOR concentrated solar plant from local producers.
  • Morocco has lifted all subsidies on diesel, gasoline and heavy fuel oil to encourage more efficient use of energy and to free up resources to invest in the transition to a green economy.
  • The Plan Maroc Vert aims to protect the environment as well as the livelihoods of Moroccans. Agriculture accounts for only 15% of its Gross Domestic Product, but farming still employs 40% of its workforce.
  • Morocco has begun treating its ocean as a natural resource with the same importance as the land, with improved coastal zone management and the development of sustainable aquaculture. Fishing makes up 56% of the country’s agricultural exports.
  • Morocco is making an effort to conserve its underground aquifers, a natural source of fresh water that, if left clean and undisturbed, replenishes itself. It’s a win for the environment and for current and future generations of Moroccans.

The future of Africa is at risk

Climate Risks in Africa – Attempt at quantification: The future of Africa is at risk, and it is the responsibility of the global community to take action. The people of Africa deserve a chance to build a better future, free from the threats of climate change. The world must come together to support the African continent in its efforts to address these risks, protect its communities, and ensure a sustainable future for all.

Africa is facing a significant challenge in adapting to a changing climate. However, with the right support and investment, the region has the potential to mitigate the impacts of climate change and build a more sustainable future for its people. The international community must take action to support Africa in its efforts to address the impacts of climate change, including providing financial and technical assistance.